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04.13.2006

KILLING 66 PEOPLE IS NOT ENOUGH FOR HAMAS SUICIDE BOMBING MASTERMIND ABDULLAH BARGHOUTI -- "I WANT MORE" HE SAYS FROM HIS JAIL CELL -- "60 MINUTES" SUNDAY

Three Remorseless Terrorists, Including a Woman, Speak of the Unspeakable

With the blood of 66 innocent people already on his hands, only the 67 life sentences he is serving keep Hamas suicide bombing mastermind Abdullah Barghouti from slaughtering more. That's what Bob Simon learns inside one of Israel's most secure prisons, where he also speaks to two other Palestinian terrorists, a man and a woman, for a 60 MINUTES report to be broadcast Sunday, April 16 (7:00-8:00 PM, ET/PT) on the CBS Television Network.

"I feel bad because the number is only 66. This is the answer you want to hear?" says Barghouti. "Yes, I feel bad because I want more," he tells Simon, even though the 66, which includes five Americans, is the most Israeli deaths attributed to one terrorist.

Palestinian terrorists share a common motivation: to drive Israel out of what they claim to be Palestinian land. But their actions are often driven by personal agendas, too. Barghouti still wants revenge for the deaths of his two best friends -- also Hamas terrorists -- in a 2001 Israeli helicopter attack. "After I see [their deaths] what do you think [I would do]? Sit in the home…cry? No…the holy Koran tell me, 'Who try to destroy you, you should destroy him,'" says Barghouti.

Simon finds out that pure anger can also drive the violence. A Palestinian man's transformation from nurse to murdering terrorist began when he was enraged by the sight of Palestinians who were shot by Israelis during a riot at a mosque. A few months later, Muhammed Jalala took a knife to a bus stop where men and women waited. "I decide to stab him," he tells Simon. Then he stabbed many more, "and then they started to shout, they try to attack me and then begin the party." When it was over, Jalala stabbed 12 people, killing four women. "If you kill my wife, I have to kill yours. This is a punishment," says Jalala. "I believe any occupied people have to defend themselves [by] any means."

What was going through his mind during his frenzy? "I just saw the black title. The revenge is the only means to stop our people's killing," Jalala tells Simon.

Inside a women's prison, Simon encountered a very different kind of terrorist. Amna Muna wanted the fame that went along with helping the Palestinian cause, but unlike most of her fellow inmates, she did not plan to blow herself up. She lured a 16-year-old Israeli boy to his death by enticing him sexually over the Internet. "The aim was to kidnap him and to let all the world know what our families felt when [Israelis] killed our sons," says Muna.

The boy, thinking he was meeting her for a sexual encounter, got in Muna's car and was machine- gunned to death a few moments later by her fellow terrorists waiting down the road. "I have to be proud [of the murder]. There is something inside me all the time telling me I am kind inside myself, and I will continue to be kind," she tells Simon. Muna says she was in shock at the time and can't recall what exactly happened. She remembers the boy, however. "He was cute."