Press Release < back to list
04.30.2012

IS GOD PROUD OF US? NO, SAY THE VAST MAJORITY, BUT HALF SAY HE LOVES US - 60 MINUTES/VANITY FAIR POLL

IDEAS FOR CHANGE TRUMP PARTY AND PERSONALITY FOR

UNDECIDED VOTERS ON ELECTION DAY

 

IT’S CLOSE, BUT MORE WANT TO LIVE AND DIE IN N.Y., NOT L.A.

MAKE MY BURGER WELL DONE, SAY 36 PERCENT


      New York, N.Y.— God may not be proud of us, but half of Americans believe he loves us. Undecided on Election Day? A candidate’s ideas for change, rather than political party or personality, would sway more Americans’ votes. New York inches out Los Angeles as the city most Americans say they would choose to live in for the rest of their lives. And that quintessential American dish, the hamburger, is best served well done, say more Americans. So says the latest 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair Poll, the results of which can be found in the June issue of Vanity Fair and online at 60minutes.com and VF.com.   Got to the poll.

      Also in this month’s poll: the music most find hardest to enjoy, the European country most would skip on vacation, and what Americans believe is the greatest archeological find.  

      God be not proud of His people. Just 5 percent picked pride as the emotion to best describe the attitude of the deity toward humanity, regardless of their religious beliefs. Forty-nine percent, however, picked love. But right behind that choice, at 30 percent, was disappointment. Very few picked disinterest (7 percent) or anger (5 percent).

      Asked what would determine their vote if they were still undecided on Election Day, 47 percent of those polled chose “The best ideas for change” over “Liking a candidate the best personally” (28 percent) and “Sharing the same party as you” (20 percent). Those identifying themselves as independent are the most likely to choose “ideas for change” (54 percent), while Republicans are more apt to let party affect their choice (34 percent) than are Democrats (25 percent).

      New York (46 percent) inched by Los Angeles (40 percent) among all Americans polled as the city they would like to live out the rest of their lives in, if they had to choose. Age and gender are a factor, with those under 45 picking New York (58 percent) and those over 45 choosing Los Angeles (48 percent). Women (45 percent) like L.A. and men (52 percent) prefer New York.

      How do they want that burger? “Well done,” say more Americans (36 percent). “Medium” places second at 29 percent, with only 19 percent picking “medium rare” and 4 percent preferring theirs “rare.” Eleven percent say they do not eat burgers.

      Heavy metal is too heavy on the ears, apparently, with nearly half (47 percent) of Americans picking the loud rock music as the genre they find hardest to enjoy; Greece (25 percent) beat out Germany (23 percent) and France (21 percent) as the country more Americans would skip on a European vacation; and the Dead Sea Scrolls are by far (38 percent) the most important archeological find for Americans, burying King Tut’s tomb (18 percent) and Pompeii (14 percent) by wide margins.

     The June issue of Vanity Fair will be available on newsstands in New York and L.A. on May 3 and nationally and on the iPad, Nook, and Kindle on May 8.
 
     The 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair Poll is a monthly measure of the American conversation on a range of topics rather than one specific subject. Geared to offer a wide-angle view of the country every 30 days, the questions explore attitudes on culture, lifestyle, current events, and politics. 60 Minutes and Vanity Fair work together to formulate topics and questions; the poll is conducted by the CBS News Election and Survey Unit, a high-profile source of American opinion since 1969.    

*   *   *


Press contacts:
Kevin Tedesco, 212-975-2329, kev@cbsnews.com 
Beth Kseniak, 212-286-7297, beth_kseniak@condenast.com

This poll was conducted at the CBS News interviewing facility among a random sample of 986 adults nationwide, interviewed by telephone March 21—25, 2012. Phone numbers were dialed from random-digit-dial samples of both standard landline and cell phones.  The error due to sampling for results based on the entire sample could be plus or minus 3 percentage points.  The error for subgroups is higher.  This poll release conforms to the Standards of Disclosure of the National Council on Public Polls.

Press:

Kevin Tedesco
212-975-2329
kev@cbsnews.com